A pick and mix budget - and this government's going the way Woolworth's went!

Bidget 2009

Nick Clegg has described yesterday's Budget as "a pick and mix Budget of recycled announcements from a government skilled in raising people's hopes but incompetent at actually delivering help."

Responding to Alistair Darling's Budget, Nick Clegg said: "Today we got a pick and mix Budget of recycled announcements from a government skilled in raising people's hopes but incompetent at actually delivering help."

"The Liberal Democrats would get practical help to people who are struggling and cut the vast majority of people's Income Tax bills by £700, paid for by taking aggressive action to clamp down on all the loopholes and exemptions that benefit the richest people and biggest businesses."

"This Budget is a political supermarket sweep of random promises, without even a hint of a plan or any likelihood the promises will be put into practice."

Pick and Mix specialists Woolworth's went bust earlier this year. This Labour government is on a similar path. "The country deserves something different."

Britain's unfair tax system

The Government claims that by raising the top rate of tax to 50% for people earning over £150,000 it will raise £1.1bn. The IFS however says it will raise far less than this as people will simply avoid it, for example by presenting their income as capital and therefore only have to pay 18% of Capital Gains Tax.

Capital Gains Tax should be taxed as income and other loopholes closed.

Nick Clegg said: "The biggest disappointment in this Budget is its failure to sort out Britain's unfair tax system. To put money into people's pockets to help them make it through this recession."

"Britain's taxes are too heavy on those who can least afford it. And too easy to avoid for those who know how.

"The 50p rate will further encourage the very wealthy to avoid tax unless we tackle the unfair loopholes they exploit."

Government Debt

The Government budget deficit over the next 5 years is going to cost £32,000 per household. The government has not made the long term tough choices which will return our economy back to stability in the future.

Nick Clegg said: "We would take big choices about what government should and shouldn't do."

"With a shocking deficit this year of £175bn we need a national debate about what the state can and cannot afford in the future."

"That is the responsible way - the honest way - to reduce spending in the years ahead and avoid painful higher taxes."